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education iconEDUCATION


To practice safely and effectively, pharmacists must have a broad understanding of health and the Canadian health care system. They must have advanced communication skills to manage and interpret information. A wide range of interprofessional and intraprofessional interaction is necessary in pharmacy practice in Canada. A pharmacist must act in a professional manner at all times. They must be kind and considerate and develop trusting relationships with their patients and colleagues. Pharmacists will encounter many complex and ethical issues on a daily basis, and will need to have good problem-solving skills. Pharmacists work with people of various cultures who have different values, beliefs and customs. They must have good judgment and the ability to interact with the public and other healthcare providers.

Orientation to the Canadian Health Care System, Culture and Context is a course offered by the University of Toronto and is designed for internationally educated health professionals who are in the process of becoming licensed in Canada. This course provides learners with a deepened understanding of the Canadian health care system, what Canadian patients expect from their health care providers, and how to communicate with patients and caregivers. It is offered three times per year and is facilitated by trained instructors. The course is fully online, and is delivered over ten weeks at a cost of $325.00. Please note that this course is not mandatory.

 

Canadian university pharmacy programs

 

Canadian university pharmacy programs are designed to ensure that graduates have all the necessary skills, knowledge and abilities when they enter into pharmacy practice. Pharmacy practice in Canada is continually changing. The scope of practise has expanded over the past several years requiring that pharmacists use even more of their cognitive skills in a clinically oriented environment. Pharmacists also require a high level of adaptability. The “Professional Competencies for Canadian Pharmacists at Entry to Practice" list all of those competencies and outline the criteria for meeting those standards.

 

In Canada, there are there are ten schools of pharmacy, all of which are accredited by the Canadian Council for Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP).

 

University Location CCAPP Accredited Pharmacy Program Language
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta
Baccalaureate in Pharmacy

English

University of British Columbia
Vancouver, British Columbia

Baccalaureate in Pharmacy

Doctor of Pharmacy

(as the initial degree in pharmacy)

English
Dalhousie University
Halifax, Nova Scotia
Baccalaureate in Pharmacy

English

Université Laval
Québec, Québec

Baccalaureate in Pharmacy

Doctorat en pharmacie (as the initial degree in pharmacy)

French
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg, Manitoba

Baccalaureate in Pharmacy

 

English
Memorial University of Newfoundland
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador
Baccalaureate in Pharmacy
English
Université de Montréal
Montréal, Québec

Doctorat en pharmacie (as the initial degree in pharmacy)

French
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Baccalaureate in Pharmacy
English
University of Toronto
Toronto, Ontario

Baccalaureate in Pharmacy

Doctor of Pharmacy (post-graduate)

Doctor of Pharmacy (as the initial degree in pharmacy)

 

English
University of Waterloo
Kitchener, Ontario

Baccalaureate in Pharmacy

 

Doctor of Pharmacy (as the initial degree in pharmacy)

 

English

 

The Canadian Council for Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP) evaluates each pharmacy program to ensure that students are provided with the proper education and training for a career in pharmacy, supporting the professional competency requirements for Canadian pharmacists at entry to practice.

As an international pharmacy graduate (IPG), you must be able to demonstrate that your education is equivalent to that of a graduate of a Canadian pharmacy program. This equivalence is demonstrated by the successful completion of the Evaluating Examination, an examination conducted by the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada (PEBC) for all provinces except Québec.

International Pharmacy Graduates (IPGs) who want to practise in the province of Québec and who are NOT graduates from France are invited to enrol in Pharmacists’ Gateway Canada, then apply for an assessment of your education and training.